Why I’m Dumping my iPhone 5 for the Galaxy Note 3 and Galaxy Gear

I’ve had an iPhone since the first one came out.  I’ve said for years that the iPhone would be the one tech device I would keep if I could only keep one.  Apple definitely raised the bar on smart phones with the first iPhone.  But, they have not kept up the pace and Samsung has overtaken the iPhone in terms of functionality and value.

Feature

Samsung Galaxy Note 3

iPhone 5

Device in General

Battery Life

Great

Poor and unpredictable

Screen Size

Great (baby boomer…)

Small for my old eyes

App Stability

Great

Really poor

Expandable Memory

Unlimited

No

UI

good

Good

Device Reliability

Great

Poor and unpredictable

Platform Reach

Wide

Narrow

Amazon Integration

Great

What?

Google Integration

Great

What?

Music

Good

Good

Voice Command Integration

Great

Good

Samsung Gear (wrist watch)

Answer Calls and talk

Yes

Na

Know when you walk away from your phone

Yes

Na

Receive and respond to text messages

Yes

Na

Get alerts from Facebook

Yes

Na

Get alerts from twitter

Yes

Na

Fitness integration

Yes

Na

Integrated Camera

Yes

Na

Integrated Voice Memo

Yes

Na

Specific Apps I use

Google Music v iTunes

Good

Good

NPR

Great

Unreliable

MapMyRun

Great

Unreliable

Kindle Reader

Great

What? Can’t see it…

Kindle Audio Books

Great

Available

The biggest issue for most iPhone users switching to Android / Samsung will be losing iTunes.  I thought this would be a big problem but it turned out not to be.  One of the great features of the Galaxy is the mini SD slot.  I bought a 64 Gig mini SD card from Amazon Prime (on my note 3 browser) and got it the next day for $50.  I copied by iTunes library onto the SD card, plugged it into the Samsung and opened up my Google Play Music App, it saw the music right away.

I also love the Android swype keyboard.  It is so fast and intuitive. I still need to figure out how to spell words with two letters in a row.  Although the voice recognition is great as well, come acoustic surroundings preclude the effective use of voice recognition.

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